Tag Archives: Building automation

Electronic Design Europe News Brand Building A Path To Better Building Efficiency

Europe’s energy-inefficient buildings consume 40% of available energy. Lighting, air-conditioning, and heating are the main culprits.

Buildings in Europe devour a prodigious 40% of total available end-user energy (see figure above). Obviously, curtailing that inefficiency becomes imperative, particularly in light of the European Union’s (EU) goals to reduce CO2 emissions by 20%, improve energy efficiency by 20% and achieve 20% renewable power generation by 2020.

One of the EU’s prime strategies toward achieving these environmental ambitions involves the use of information and communications technology (ICT). It believes ICT will be able to facilitate a “whole building approach” in design and building operation through simulation, modeling, analysis, monitoring, and visualization tools. ICT also can play essential roles in simplifying the implementation of energy policies, and in measuring their effectiveness.

To support this course of action, the EU Directive on the Energy Performance of Buildings was instituted to provide a methodology that calculates the energy performance of buildings. If successfully implemented, the data provided would assist in identifying common inefficiencies, best practices, and opportunities to improve energy usage.

Such a meritorious stance from the European Commission must be applauded. However, these proposals will only develop into pragmatic reality by enlisting expertise from the electronics industry.

With this in mind, 26 industry companies from five European countries will partner over a three-year period in what is hoped will be trailblazing research on environmental sensors and sensor networks. The mission is to develop energy-efficient solutions aimed at cutting power usage in buildings.

The “Environmental Sensors for Energy Efficiency” (ESEE) project is led by German chipmaker Infineon Technologies and supported by the EU through its European Nanoelectronics Initiative Advisory Council (ENIAC) Joint Undertaking, as well as by national and regional funding of the participating nations. Among others, Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research supports the ESEE project under its “Information and Communication Technology 2020” program.

Essential Component

An essential element within modern building-management systems is a sensor-system network. Unsurprisingly, the focus of the ESEE project is to create new low-power connected sensor systems based on semiconductors and heterogeneous 3D integration.ESEE plans to target applications that require extremely reliable information about environmental conditions to identify measures that will help reduce energy consumption. When combined with solutions for air-quality management, the project believes the potential to inner-building energy savings could go beyond 30%.

All of this sits very comfortably with the European Commission’s Europe 2020 initiative to cut greenhouse gas emissions and improve energy efficiency. One key enabler, though, surrounds the development, design, and manufacture of sensor- and energy-management systems in Europe at competitive costs.

The ESEE project is timed to conclude in March 2016. It will be interesting to see what technological progress is made, considering sensors and controls continue to be profoundly overlooked despite the critical roles they play in building energy management.

In addition to the environmental imperative to minimize energy use, there’s considerable financial incentive to develop building control networks that fully exploit interconnected sensor-based systems. Industry analysts suggest the sensors market in the U.S. and Europe is set to grow nearly 20% annually from now until 2020. In value terms, the U.S. market would be worth $2.14 billion by that time, while the Europe sector would reach $1.93 billion.

Lux Research’s recent report “Sensors and Controls for Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS): Providing the Neural Network to Net-Zero Energy” sheds another light. It indicates that key to sensor sector growth will be a profusion of advanced non-invasive, cost-effective, and quick-to-install sensor and control technologies that can overcome existing cost constraints.

It is certainly true that wireless-based, energy-harvesting, network-enabled sensors, switches, and associated media technologies will lower installation costs.

In summary, it appears that the overall environmental prospects look positive in terms of more efficient building consumption. More so when taking into account those companies involved in the research and development of capable sensor control networks are fueled by the dual incentives of reducing global emissions and substantial commercial reward.

Article By:  | Electronic Design Europe News Brand

St. John’s Makes Energy Upgrades To 36 Buildings, Installs Building Automation System

St. John’s Hospital in Maplewood, MN, received a $300,000 grant for a $1 million building automation system upgrade and retro-commissioning project that covered all facility air handling units and heating and cooling systems.

St. John’s Hospital in Maplewood, MN, received a $300,000 grant for a $1 million building automation system upgrade and retro-commissioning project that covered all facility air handling units and heating and cooling systems.

State ARRA-funded C&I grant helps fund building retrofit: St. John’s Hospital in Maplewood, MN, is constantly seeking ways to improve its infrastructure in the most cost-effective ways. And when the stimulus-funded Commercial and Industrial Grant Program from the Minnesota Department of Commerce came along, it made energy efficiency easy.

St. John’s Hospital received a $300,000 grant for a $1 million building automation system upgrade and retro-commissioning project that covered all facility air handling units and heating and cooling systems. The grant, combined with other energy improvements financed by the St. Paul Port Authority and the Trillion Btu Program, will save St. John’s about $200,000 per year in energy costs. Simple payback for the $1 million project is about five years.

“We’re always looking for ways to improve our infrastructure—to improve clinical quality, increase efficiency, reduce risk, and improve safety,” said Jed Field, system director of engineering for HealthEast Care System. “The state grant allowed us to take the extra step or two from an energy-efficiency perspective to achieve the maximum energy savings for our buildings.”

Field said the grant was perfect timing for several large-scale improvements the hospital needed. The work, completed in 2011, included operational improvements and control of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems to attain maximum energy performance. New NEMA premium efficiency motors were installed to replace all non-NEMA premium motors 10 HP or larger. The new building automation system was implemented so that equipment can be turned down or turned off when the spaces served are unoccupied. Equipment adjustments were made and special pump controls and valves were installed for precise control to meet heating and cooling needs.

The energy upgrade work on St. John’s Hospital not only reduces energy costs, it improved the indoor air quality and comfort for patients and staff. It also generated work for at least two full-time equivalent jobs for one year, Field added.

Field said virtually any commercial or industrial facility that is 20 years or older figures to save 20 percent on their energy bill if they make significant energy upgrades. “There are great opportunities for retrofitting buildings,” Field added.

36 facilities realize energy efficiency, cost savings: St. John’s is just one of dozens of commercial, industrial and nonprofit facilities throughout Minnesota that are realizing handsome energy and cost savings, thanks in part to the $4.1 million energy upgrade grant program administered by the Minnesota Department of Commerce, Division of Energy Resources. The grants, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), supported cost-effective energy efficiency improvements at 36 facilities in Minnesota.

Those 36 facilities will realize more than $3 million in ongoing energy savings every year for the foreseeable future, said Mike Rothman, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Commerce. “This targeted investment of one-time funds will pay for itself over and over again,” said Rothman. “It has helped dozens of facilities dramatically reduce their energy consumption and realize millions of dollars in ongoing cost savings. That’s good for business, good for our environment, and good for our economy.

“Commercial buildings and industrial facilities like St. John’s Hospital consume about half of our state’s energy,” Rothman continued. “That’s why it makes sense to target large buildings like these. Targeted retrofits using one-time investments deliver the biggest bang for our buck.”

The program, which launched in December 2009, received 150 proposals out of which 39 were selected to receive grants. Most of the grants—36—were awarded for direct energy improvement projects, and three were given to nonprofit entities to operate revolving loan programs to help finance energy efficiency projects. For the direct improvement projects, the program required a financial match component. Projects were ranked according to projected energy savings, payback, leveraged additional spending per grant dollar, and job labor hours of work generated by the funding.

Average payback of four years: The grantees included a wide cross section of for-profit and nonprofit entities. Energy efficiency measures achieved included upgrades to lighting, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems and controls and improvements to industrial processes. Overall, the projects will save an estimated 440,000 MMBtu per year, or enough energy to heat 8,150 homes per year, and will have an average payback of four years. The projects helped create or sustain more than 25 full-time equivalent jobs.

The Chippewa Valley Ethanol Plant in Benson used its grant to improve the process to recover waste heat from a stream of hot exhaust gases discharged from a regenerative thermal oxidizer. The process captures heat that normally would be exhausted into the atmosphere, runs it through a heat exchanger, and then uses it to avoid burning natural gas to produce heat needed for other parts of the ethanol production process. Chippewa Valley received a $500,000 grant to help fund the $2 million project. With estimated savings of $700,000 in natural gas costs per year, the project will pay for itself in about three years.

Gerdau Ameristeel U.S. Inc. of Duluth replaced two 30-year-old 900 kW power supplies with two new energy efficient 1,125 kW power supplies. The power is used to heat steel bar stock which is cut and forged into steel balls varying in size from 1 inch to 6 inches in diameter. The steel balls produced from the operation are used extensively in the taconite mining industry of Minnesota as well as other ore processing operations globally. The $1.5 million project, which received a $95,000 grant, is projected to reduce Gerdau’s energy consumption by 7 percent and save about $50,000 per year.

Other companies to benefit from the state energy grant program included 3M Company, Aeon, Aitkin Iron Works, Arrowhead Promotion and Fulfillment Company Inc., Caledonia Care and Rehab, Cambria Company LLC, Center for Energy and Environment, City Center Retail/AG 800 Washington LLC, City of Minneapolis CPED, Coastal Seafoods, Community Reinvestment Fund, Davisco Foods International Inc., Douglas Machine Inc., Earl Brown Tower LLP, Fairview Health Services (Maple Grove), FourCrown Inc. (Wendy’s), Habitat for Humanity of South Central Minnesota, Honeywell, J&B Group Inc., Le Sueur Inc., LifeCare Medical Center, Mall of America, National Sports Center Foundation, North Memorial Health Care (Maple Grove), Northern Plains Dairy, Pequot Tool & Mfg. Inc., Prospect Foundry LLC, Resource Inc., Rolco Inc., Seagate Technology LLC, Spruce Tree Center LLP, SuperValu Inc., Walker Art Center, Wausau Paper Mills LLC, YMCA of Greater St. Paul, and YWCA of Minneapolis.

To learn more: For more information from the Division of Energy Resources, visit the efficiency section of our website. Incentives for businesses and residences to perform energy efficiency upgrades are listed in the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency.

This case study was created by the Minnesota Division of Energy Resources, Department of Commerce. Click here to see other success storie
Read more at http://cleantechnica.com/2013/05/25/st-johns-makes-energy-upgrades-to-36-buildings-installs-building-automation-system/#3bHxrAkedzI3Xij6.99

St. John’s Hospital in Maplewood, MN, received a $300,000 grant for a $1 million building automation system upgrade and retro-commissioning project that covered all facility air handling units and heating and cooling systems.

St. John’s Hospital in Maplewood, MN, received a $300,000 grant for a $1 million building automation system upgrade and retro-commissioning project that covered all facility air handling units and heating and cooling systems.

US Building Automation Market Primed for Growth

Could Help Commercial Structures Cope with Rising Energy Costs
The U.S. market for building automation equipment is set to grow by more than 40 percent within a five-year period ending in 2017, spurred by the need in commercial buildings for more efficient energy consumption, according to a new report from IHS Inc. (NYSE: IHS).

With electricity rates on the rise, driven by increasing wholesale prices and investments in renewable sources of energy, demand for lower energy consumption in buildings is bound to occur, the findings in the report entitled “Building Automation Equipment” suggest.

All told, the U.S. building automation systems market will reach a projected $1.65 billion by year-end, up 5 percent from $1.57 billion in 2012. Solid growth ranging from 7 to 9 percent will follow in the next four years, with industry revenue forecast to hit $2.24 billion by 2017, equivalent to a 43 percent increase from 2012, as shown in the below figure.

The spiraling cost of electricity is a major factor in the operational efficiency of a commercial building structure, which explains why building automation systems could play an important role. Prices for U.S. retail electric power will increase by 8 percent from 2012 to 2020, IHS CERA forecasts, with a sizable proportion of the increase in price related to the investments being made by the market in renewable energy.

A similar story is unfolding in Germany, where the Energiewende policy is promoting the move away from nuclear and fossil-fuel power generation and toward renewable sources of energy. Such investments are driving up the cost of energy overall and adding pressure to the already stretched operational budgets of many commercial and government organizations.

“With budgets cut and many large companies struggling to grow at more than 5 percent on an annual basis, the higher cost of electricity could prove to be a major headache for commercial and government building owners,” said Sam Grinter, market analyst for the Building Technologies group at IHS.
The solution to rising energy prices

In particular, buildings consume huge quantities of energy through heating, ventilation and cooling, Grinter noted. “Making buildings as efficient as possible is crucial to driving down energy consumption. And one way to increase energy efficiency is to install an integrated building automation system,” Grinter noted.

Building automation systems centrally manage the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems of a structure. Compared to more basic mechanisms, building automation systems can save a considerable amount of energy consumption, via scheduled periods of heating or through cooling controlled by a thermostat, to cite two examples. Some vendors of building automation systems claim that energy savings of more than 30 percent can be obtained when evaluated against conventional HVAC systems.

This is why building owners will increasingly look to building automation systems to achieve savings on energy consumption, especially as the cost of electricity keeps going up, IHS believes.

www.ihs.com

Building Automation Systems Revenue to Reach $100.8 Billion in 2021

Building Automation Systems Revenue to Reach $100.8 Billion in 2021

 

Global commercial building automation systems revenue will grow from $58.1 billion in 2013 to $100.8 billion in 2021, according to a study by Navigant Research.

Commercial building automation systems continue to evolve from point solutions built from proprietary products toward open and integrated systems based on modern digital information technologies. Integrated by new building management systems, the automation of HVAC, lighting, fire and life safety, and security and access controls is increasingly forming the foundational infrastructure for advanced energy management products and services. The resulting solutions are aimed at reducing the nearly 12 percent of total global energy end use by the commercial sector, according to Commercial Building Automation Systems.

The global market for commercial building automation systems is driven in general by new and retrofit commercial building construction and more specifically by the energy efficiencyrequirements applied to this construction. New commercial construction has been suppressed by the financial crisis of 2008 in most of the global market, with the exception of certain parts of Asia Pacific, and the building controls market has suffered as a result, according to the report.

However, renewed economic growth and accelerating energy efficiency targets for commercial buildings are combining to offer significant market growth opportunities. Additionally, the adoption of new embedded computing, communications, sensing, and software technologies is fundamentally changing the underlying products and services within the commercial BAS market, presenting risks and rewards for various industry stakeholders, the report says.

The North American building automation systems market generated revenue of $535.3 million in 2011, up 0.7 percent over the previous year, according to a report by Frost & Sullivan released in October 2012.

By: Energy Manager Today Staff

Setpoint Systems Corporation and Coppertree Analytics Announce New Strategic Partnership

Littleton, Colorado November 25, 2013

Since 1983, Setpoint Systems Corporation, an independent integrator of building control systems has been uniquely positioned to offer fully integrated system solutions on a common communications network. Their diverse and dynamic portfolio includes: 40+ story high-rise commercial office buildings, 1000+ room hotels, university campuses, K-12 school districts, hospitals, 40-megawatt data centers, top-secret military facilities, jails and prisons, and major league sports stadiums.

“Our customers are seeking to maximize every area of their buildings and facilities. We strive to provide optimal and collaborative solutions for their project. CopperTrees’ approach to analytics is focused on gaining insight into large and complex data sets in order to reach your building’s maximum potential.” – Aaron Nahale, CEO, Setpoint Systems Corporation

CopperTree Analytics’ approach was driven out of frustration with “smart” buildings not delivering on the promise of intelligent and efficient operation. From its inception, the team at CopperTree knew there must be better ways to operate buildings, and they made it their mission to make buildings easier to monitor, diagnose, improve, and manage.

About Coppertree Analytics:
For more than 30 years, Coppertree’s parent companies – Delta Controls (one of the largest independent building controls manufacturers) and ESC (Western Canada’s largest building systems integrator) – have been at the forefront of creating SMART buildings. Long before ‘sustainable’ was a buzz word, the founders were involved in energy audits and consulting; and so it was a natural extension to create Coppertree in response to the growing demand for building energy management services.

Our heritage means we combine an implicit understanding of the technology, which controls buildings with the practicalities of maintaining them – so you get a solution, which delivers genuine energy savings. Know your energy issues – Fix what is broken.

Put simply, Coppertree analytics provides energy management and fault detection diagnostics as software-as-a-service, which delivers you the power to optimize your building performance.

We were frustrated how SMART buildings aren’t delivering on the promise ‘intelligent’ buildings inspired and we know we can fix that. Our mission is to lessen the climate changing impact of buildings by making them easier to monitor and manage.

Based outside Vancouver, a city with a booming tech sector, we share a similar profile being young and multicultural. Our average age is 33, and diverse cultural backgrounds from Vietnam and India to Ireland and Russia. Learn more at coppertreeanalytics.com.

Contact Information
Setpoint Systems Corporation
Corporate Headquarter
8167 Southpark Circle
Littleton, CO 80120

+1.303.733.2300

Info.setpointsystems.com

Coppertree Analytics
100 – 5265 185A Street
Surrey, BC V3s 7A4

+1.604.575.5943

info.coppertreeanalytics.com

Smart cities: innovation in energy will drive sustainable cities

Urbanisation makes cities a main focus for environmental policy. Digital technology and innovation will enable a better quality of life and reduced energy consumption

The Riverside Museum

The Museum of Transport in Glasgow. The city was awarded £24m funding to implement its future cities programme Photograph: Murdo Macleod

Cities represent three quarters of energy consumption and 80% of CO2 emissions worldwide, and represent the largest of any environmental policy challenge. Urbanisation is only set to increase, cities house half the world’s population today but are set to host three quarters in 2050.

To cope with this continued urban growth we will need to invent new ways to manage cities and make them more effective. The convergence between digital technology and the world of energy, or Energy 3.0, will pave the way for a new ecosystem of services which will enable both a better quality of life and reduced energy consumption.

The pathway to more sustainable cities

Marc Andreessen, co-founder of the first widely used web browser, famously said that “Software is eating the world”. Andreessen’s statement seems truer every day, digital technologies, after revolutionising the information technology sector, are now transforming all economic sectors, including energy. This sector will see increasing numbers of consumers producing their own energy, not only sharing it with one another but also customising it for their own personal use.

Innovations that marry the digital and energy disciplines are widespread, including technology that controls the energy consumption of buildings and interoperable communicating devices – such as temperature and air quality sensors, variable speed drives and robots, as well as smart meters and intensity and colour controlled LED lighting. These are examples of the technology that is changing the way we use energy.

Network Rail is one of the businesses driving forward innovation. Its newly built national centre was awarded a BREEAM excellent rating. The building blends engineering, architecture and technology to incorporate sustainable design features and energy performance metrics. Carbon dashboards have been installed throughout showing energy consumption, raising awareness and putting staff in a position to improve a building’s energy performance.

Extending the Internet of Things to create smart cities

The burgeoning field of smart cities and the Energy 3.0 era will be made possible by two technological breakthroughs, close to root of the concept of “internet of things“: more efficient and miniaturised sensors and networks that interconnect all objects to one another.

Today, the quality of air and water, the movement of people and objects, the changes in weather, the road traffic, the production and consumption of energy, can be measured by sensors, and tracked and interconnected through networks in real time. It is through interconnecting buildings, factories, vehicles, power generation plants, lighting, that cities will be “smart”.

This requires working on open and non-proprietary standards. It means training electricians, heating engineers, construction companies, facility managers, so they are able to connect the relevant equipment together. Being facilitators of energy, electrical distributors play a key role in informing, training installers in the electrical infrastructure, and in the integration of electrical devices and creation of easy-to-install, end-to-end electrical solutions. We are currently at the beginning of this revolution enabling the aggregation of energy production and its consumption, but it’s rapidly gaining momentum.

Empowering people in smart cities

In the same way that the IT revolution has been driven by consumer needs, so too will the energy revolution. As blogs, social networks and video platforms have enabled people to produce information and customise their content, new technologies will make possible energy self-production and customisation of energy usages and consumption.

Smart cities will also enable the use of open data which will create new urban services such as better transport connections, accident risk warnings and home monitoring for part-time and full-time carers. Local councils will have greater responsibility for ensuring the collection and the public availability of this data.

Furthermore, by leveraging this data, businesses will be able to offer personalised services for users, for example smart meter data could permit utilities to offer new tariffs, such as time-of use pricing which will encourage end-users to use energy in off-peak times when it is cheaper.

Cities leading the way

The UK, in common with many countries, understands the importance and benefits of a smarter and more sustainable future, and is investing, where relevant, to help drive the innovations that will enable this.

Last year, the UK government launched a £24m competition for a large-scale demonstrator in its hunt for ideas for a “future city”. Glasgow City Council was awarded the funding earlier this year.

The winning bid outlined how public, private and academic sectors can combine expertise and use cutting-edge technology to enhance day-to-day life in the city. The city’s programme covers several projects including: the creation of an integrated operations centre managing a new futuristic public space CCTV network and roads management systems; greater use of green technology such as white street lighting; and a city dashboard giving real time information on traffic flow, weather alerts, accident and emergency waiting times, rail and bus services and road gritting etc.

Glasgow isn’t the only UK city driving forward a smarter city approach. London boasts well-recognised sustainability innovations and a robust transit system. The city is also home to the Smart Cities research centre housed at Imperial College, which leverages transport, government, business, academic and consumer data in the hope of making the city more efficient and innovative

In the United States, Boston ranked first out of 34 of the most populated US cities in the City Energy Efficiency Scorecard. It was ranked on its policies and other actions to advance energy efficiency, across five policy areas: local government operations; buildings; energy and water utilities; transportation; and the community as a whole. The city of Boston has partnered with companies such as IBM and Schneider Electric to reach its smart city goals.

The urban revolution is already at work, but ultimately innovation will drive advances in technology, expansion of the internet of things and the empowerment of consumers, all of which will result in smarter and more sustainable cities.

Rudy Provoost is president of the Rexel Foundation for a better energy future, chairman of Rexel’s Management Board and author of Energy 3.0

Incorporate lighting controls with BAS to save energy- Part 1

Incorporating daylighting and lighting controls with a building automation system can result in energy savings.

Learning objectives

  1. Understand the benefits of incorporating lighting, daylighting, and building automation systems.
  2. Know the codes and standards that govern lighting and daylighting.
  3. Learn to gather and analyze data from an automation system.

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